Teenage Prayers

This Brooklyn-based sextet finishes its debut album with a cover of Solomon Burke’s “Goodbye Baby” produced by the soul legend himself. While having Burke’s stamp of approval is nice (he flew them to L.A. to for the recording), this group didn’t need it to confirm what one listen through Ten Songs reveals: they’re one of…

Neil Young (and Crazy Horse)

Dirty rock’n’roller-hippie narcissist. Rockabilly hepcat-techno troubadour. Folkie romantic-bluesy bad boy. Harmony supergroup sore thumb-beloved bandleader. Cultural analyst-grandfather of grunge. Neil Young has been all of these things and more in the course of an insanely prolific solo career. Though his output during the ’80s was particularly erratic, he has never stopped placing personal expression before…

Cake

Sacramento, California’s Cake were unlikely candidates to wind up with platinum album plaques on their walls, but they did. Singer John McCrea doesn’t have a great voice; half the time he sounds so detached from what he’s singing that his own irony isn’t ironic enough for him. And since when has a band with trumpet…

Long Winters

The Long Winters are one of the most fascinating quirky pop bands to come out of Seattle, a town well-known for its twisted, hook-filled songwriters, in the 21st century. Frontman John Roderick’s creative wordplay and knack for memorable melodies have attracted a who’s who of Pacific Northwest musicians, all looking to help bring his tales…

Goldfinger

Armed with a cool name, solidly adrenalized pop punk (with a side of horn-punched ska) and a helpful eye for offhand lyrics (“My Girlfriend’s Shower Sucks,” “Here in Your Bedroom,” the trendo-scene antagonism of “The City With Two Faces,” the sexual humiliation of “Mable”), this lively and colorful Los Angeles quartet was elected next big…

Son Volt

No man is an island, but Jay Farrar has made a pretty good go at it. “When in doubt, move on, no need to sort it out,” sang Farrar in “Drown,” a near hit from Son Volt’s debut album, Trace. The sentiment seemed to be the only explanation for the taciturn, inscrutable songwriter’s abrupt departure…

Gravel Pit

Starting out as a vehicle to play Def Leppard covers, the Gravel Pit evolved into a group that effortlessly meshed ’60s-influenced garage rock with quirky (and highly intelligent) pop songs to great effect. The Pit formed in 1983 when singer/organist Jedediah Parish and guitarist Jeff Juhase (aka Lucky Jackson) were classmates in a Durham, Connecticut…

Juliana Hatfield

Just as the trio was hitting its stride with its best album, 1990’s Sunburn, the Blake Babies greeted the new decade by breaking up. Singer/bassist Juliana Hatfield lit out for the big time, picking up a guitar and staking out turf as the Sassy-generation spokeswoman for adolescent angst — a niche particularly well-suited to the…

Bottle Rockets

If you’re gonna play highway-driving, bar-haunting, trailer-parking, lovesick scruffy T-shirt roots-rock, there are probably worse places to come from than Festus, Missouri. After all, it’s both Midwestern and Southern, a small town right by a big city. Fueled by the purified essence of roadhouse rock’n’roll but sweet on country swing and steering the bus with…

Contributors

These folks either wrote reviews that appear on the site or wrote for Trouser Press magazine. If anyone listed below cares to E-mail us with a link you’d like added, just let us know. And ditto if anyone is AWOL from this list. Grant AldenDavid AntrobusJem AswadTroy J. AugustoMichael AzerradCary BakerMichael BakerEmily BeckerJohn BergstromArt BlackJohn…

Trouser Press Turns 50

Saturday, March 16th, Trouser Press will celebrate its 50th birthday – and launch Zip It Up! The Best of Trouser Press Magazine 1974-1984 – with a gala party at Bowery Electric in New York. Trouser Press co-founder Ira Robbins will host.