“The bible of alternative rock”

More than a decade after the magazine ended its ten-year run, Trouser Press first went online in 1997. In 2002, we consolidated the contents of five Trouser Press Record Guides on a new site. Some updating was done, but there’s a lot of catching up to do.

This 2020 relaunch makes it a digital music publication optimized for various devices. Among the new features are a searchable (!) Trouser Press magazine archive, a photo gallery and videos. There’s a forum for sharing your thoughts. We publish books (including Ira Robbins’ novel, Marc Bolan Killed in Crash) and offer TP merch for sale.

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  • Nick Drake’s Short Ride
    His songs cast an eerie spell; they hold you in their grip and rarely let go. It’s not only that Nick Drake produced some of the finest melodies and lyrics ever or that he influenced many a romantic young man to take up the art of song. It’s the emotional intensity and sincerity of his music.
  • Matthew Sweet Dreams of Space
    Speaking from his home in Omaha, Nebraska recently, Matthew Sweet was supposed to be discussing his new album. But his mind was elsewhere – like, on another planet. “I have a real thing for Mars,” he says. “I’m really interested in astrophysics and astrobiology, so Mars things I’m always kind of excited about.”
  • Julien Temple’s Crock of Gold: Ain’t That a Shane
    Director Julien Temple talks about his new Shane MacGowan documentary, Crock of Gold. “Shane talking to other people he knows or respects gave us a more scattershot approach. We shot him and Johnny [Depp] for eight hours and probably only got three or four minutes out of it. But it was spontaneous and uninhibited.”
  • Glam Rock’s Forgotten Film
    Brothers of the Head,, which arrived hot on the platform heels of Velvet Goldmine and Hedwig and the Angry Inch, is a faux documentary about a doomed mid-’70s UK glam/punk act led by conjoined twins, told via supposedly vintage verité footage, contemporary interviews and scenes from an abandoned bio-pic allegedly directed by Ken Russell.
  • The Sensible Mr. Scabies
    The once-notorious Rat Scabies of the Damned is now a charming grandfather, drumming (remotely) in a great band with another London scene stalwart and two LA punk veterans.
Quick Takes

Arthur Brown Is Back!
Ira Robbins podcast interviews
Colored Vinyl: A Chronological Survey
French indie rock pix
The Beatles. Really?

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