“The bible of alternative rock”

More than a decade after the magazine ended its ten-year run, Trouser Press first went online in 1997. In 2002, we consolidated the contents of five Trouser Press Record Guides on a new site. Our 2020 relaunch made it a digital music publication optimized for various devices. Features include a searchable Trouser Press magazine archive, a photo gallery and videos. There’s a forum for sharing your thoughts. We publish books (including Ira Robbins’ anthology and memoir, Music in a Word) and offer TP merch for sale.

Articles | view all

  • Music in a Word: 50 Years on a Rock and Roll Soapbox
    Why do I write about music? Why does anyone? I’ve given that question a lot of thought and I have discerned subliminal motives that are less than flattering. On one hand, it’s the desire to share what moves me, to offer the benefit of serious consideration and historical knowledge to the young and curious. On a deeper level, however, it springs from a desire to be accepted and appreciated, to establish standing in the world that I hungered for as a child.
  • Nick Drake’s Short Ride
    His songs cast an eerie spell; they hold you in their grip and rarely let go. It’s not only that Nick Drake produced some of the finest melodies and lyrics ever or that he influenced many a romantic young man to take up the art of song. It’s the emotional intensity and sincerity of his music.
  • Matthew Sweet Dreams of Space
    Speaking from his home in Omaha, Nebraska recently, Matthew Sweet was supposed to be discussing his new album. But his mind was elsewhere – like, on another planet. “I have a real thing for Mars,” he says. “I’m really interested in astrophysics and astrobiology, so Mars things I’m always kind of excited about.”
  • Julien Temple’s Crock of Gold: Ain’t That a Shane
    Director Julien Temple talks about his new Shane MacGowan documentary, Crock of Gold. “Shane talking to other people he knows or respects gave us a more scattershot approach. We shot him and Johnny [Depp] for eight hours and probably only got three or four minutes out of it. But it was spontaneous and uninhibited.”
  • Glam Rock’s Forgotten Film
    Brothers of the Head,, which arrived hot on the platform heels of Velvet Goldmine and Hedwig and the Angry Inch, is a faux documentary about a doomed mid-’70s UK glam/punk act led by conjoined twins, told via supposedly vintage verité footage, contemporary interviews and scenes from an abandoned bio-pic allegedly directed by Ken Russell.
Quick Takes

Arthur Brown Is Back!
Ira Robbins podcast interviews
Colored Vinyl: A Chronological Survey
French indie rock pix
The Beatles. Really?

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