“The bible of alternative rock”

More than a decade after the magazine ended its ten-year run, Trouser Press first went online in 1997. In 2002, we consolidated the contents of five Trouser Press Record Guides on a new site. Some updating was done, but there’s a lot of catching up to do.

This 2020 relaunch makes it a digital music publication optimized for various devices. Among the new features are a searchable (!) Trouser Press magazine archive, a photo gallery and videos. There’s a forum for sharing your thoughts. We publish books (including Ira Robbins’ new novel, Marc Bolan Killed in Crash) and offer TP merch for sale.

Articles | view all

  • Julien Temple’s Crock of Gold: Ain’t That a Shane
    Director Julien Temple talks about his new Shane MacGowan documentary, Crock of Gold. “Shane talking to other people he knows or respects gave us a more scattershot approach. We shot him and Johnny [Depp] for eight hours and probably only got three or four minutes out of it. But it was spontaneous and uninhibited.”
  • Glam Rock’s Forgotten Film
    Brothers of the Head,, which arrived hot on the platform heels of Velvet Goldmine and Hedwig and the Angry Inch, is a faux documentary about a doomed mid-’70s UK glam/punk act led by conjoined twins, told via supposedly vintage verité footage, contemporary interviews and scenes from an abandoned bio-pic allegedly directed by Ken Russell.
  • The Sensible Mr. Scabies
    The once-notorious Rat Scabies of the Damned is now a charming grandfather, drumming (remotely) in a great band with another London scene stalwart and two LA punk veterans.
  • The Right Side of History
    The new documentary film White Riot covers the first two years – 1976 to 1978 — of the British activist organization Rock Against Racism. Director Rubika Shah’s style, which incorporates animation and quick edits, builds on the energy of the punk scene and includes plenty of exciting music.
  • Bob Mould’s Tower of Power
    With a huge box set retrospective and a fired-up new solo album, Bob Mould is living proof that old punks never die.
Quick Takes

Arthur Brown Is Back!
Ira Robbins podcast interviews
Colored Vinyl: A Chronological Survey
French indie rock pix
The Beatles. Really?

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