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 South Saturn Delta
Author: steevee 
Date:   10-28-17 01:23

I've been listening to Jimi Hendrix's SOUTH SATURN DELTA, a collection of previously unreleased tracks first issued in 1997, and I think it's a legitimately great album despite its hodgepodge nature. It's a mix of alternate takes of well-known songs he issued during his lifetime ("Fire," "The Stars That Play With Laughing Sam's Dice"), unreleased songs I'd never heard before and seemingly improvised instrumental jams. Hendrix proves himself the equal of the free jazz musicians who were working at the time, like Ornette Coleman and Albert Ayler. But one thing that seems really special about this album is that the instrumental jams, in particular, seem to have been selected for the sheer amount of feedback and overdriven distortion they contain. Despite being deified by baby-boomers and safely canonized by this point, the Hendrix that made most of the music on this album is a kissing cousin to Lou Reed, Wayne Kramer and Ron Asheton (and an acknowledged influence on Kramer, and a probable one on Asheton.) and points the way towards great African-American guitarists who would emerge in the '70s like Eddie Hazel and Pete Cosey.

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 Re: South Saturn Delta
Author: Michael Toland 
Date:   10-28-17 15:46

It's a while since I listened to Hendrix - I finally got completely burned out. But I do have this sitting on my shelf. I should revisit.

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 Re: South Saturn Delta
Author: MrFab 
Date:   10-28-17 18:54

Oh yeah, when I caught the free-jazz bug in the '90s and was blowin out my eardrums to Ornette, Pharaoh Sanders, late-period Coltrane, etc, as well as early Funkadelic (speaking of Eddie Hazel), Jimi was also in the mix, particularly those reissues, as well as live albums like "Band of Gypsies," and the complete Woodstock, where he really let his freak flag fly. It was a re-assessment of someone whose original studio albums had become "classic rock" radio cliches.

Def agree w the Lou Reed comparison, esp as Reed himself talked about Hendrix. The Butthole Surfers have a instro jam called "Jimi" (on the same album as another track called "Lou Reed.") Don't know if Sonic Youth are too cool to cite him as an influence, but I don't see how they couldn't.

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 Re: South Saturn Delta
Author: steevee 
Date:   10-28-17 23:37

Reed's playing on the Velvet Underground's "I Heard Her Call My Name" reminds me of Hendrix, in particular, although Hendrix didn't do an entire song so devoted to noise till his version of "The Star Spangled Banner" at Woodstock. The three Experience studio albums are great, but the long version of "Voodoo Child" on ELECTRIC LADYLAND is the one time he got to stretch out in the studio on them the way the Velvets did on "Sister Ray" and the way free jazz musicians got to do all the time. It's funny how he was anathema to punk purists at the time I got into that genre as a teenager despite the way he helped normalize feedback and noise as elements of rock guitar playing, I guess because being a virtuoso and engaging in psychedelic weirdness was uncool; a friend of mine whose taste is still based very much in punk rules once said that RADIO ONE is his best album because it contains the shortest versions of his songs.

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 Re: South Saturn Delta
Author: mats84 
Date:   10-29-17 09:39

The discussion of Hendrix and his influence always makes me think of the guy I consider his actual rival or could have been in the 70s and that's Jeff Beck.......I know a lot of people would disagree with that but usually when people think of the virtuoso 60s guitar players they were somewhat done by the 70s in a way - Clapton went singer-songwritery more, Page maintained the same thing he had already established in the 60s, Peter Green was out of commission but Beck actually built on his 60s reputation and went into things that were different from what he had done like fusion etc.

It would have been interesting to see those 2 guys in the 70s if Hendrix hand lived, because I'm not sure a guitar player was really around to push Jeff Beck even though that was the era of the guitarist with new players ..........Beck is also like that for influence - he clearly influenced punk and players who couldn't care less about punk.

Then again this just might be my take, if you don't consider Beck as the number 2 to Hendrix it might not hold water.........who knows maybe Clapton wouldn't have gone so singer-songwritery if Hendrix lived.......




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 Re: South Saturn Delta
Author: steevee 
Date:   10-29-17 17:13

Beck's playing in the Yardbirds was amazing, but I have to admit I haven't followed him after that at all or heard his fusion work (although I do like early fusion - '70s Miles Davis is my favorite jazz artist), and I have zero interest in Clapton after Derek & the Dominoes (and sometimes I think I'm being kind in having any interest in Clapton after Cream.)

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 Re: South Saturn Delta
Author: steevee 
Date:   10-31-17 22:41

BTW, one of my purchases at Mainline Records today was a used CD of BAND OF GYPSYS. When I opened the booklet, I realized I live only a few blocks from the old Fillmore East, where it was recorded. I sometimes see "East Village '60s history" tours passing by the location and talking about all the artists that played there.

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 Re: South Saturn Delta
Author: Delvin 
Date:   11-01-17 10:16

When I listen to Hendrix, I hear a one-in-a-million combination of talent, skill, vision, restless exploration, and probably twenty or more factors that I'm not capable enough (or maybe too caught up in the music) to parse out and list, but that contributed to Jimi's music.

When I listen to Jeff Beck, I hear talent, melody and undeniable technical skill, but almost no passion. Many music-loving friends whom I respect and appreciate have played his music for me and tried to show me what I'm missing, but I just don't hear it. I've seen Beck live three times, so I've seen with my own eyes how dexterously he uses his guitar to get the sounds he does. But it's still more impressive for what he's doing than for how it's speaking.

I'm not sure who I consider "number two to Hendrix." I just know it's not Beck.



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