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 Sentimental Journey
Author: HollowbodyKay 
Date:   06-12-17 12:30

Don't Stop Believing by Journey was released in 1981.

It looks like it made Billboard's Top Ten. That was 36 years ago.

36 years before that would land you in 1945.

I heard the tune in a gas station the other day. The 20-something girl behind the counter was silently singing along.

I mention this only because (having lived through 1981 and listened to a lot of radio) it seems almost impossible to recall actually hearing 40's-vintage pop music on the radio in 1981 ... while no one seems to raise an eyebrow over playing music with a similarly musty vintage (read: Journey, et al.) these days.

Am I out of my mind? Was there a ton of World War Two-vintage music being aired in 1981? And if so ... where?

Here's a sample of Top Ten items from 1945:

Sentimental Journey

Don't Fence Me In

It's Been A Long Long Time

.
.
.

The third definition offered here seems apt.

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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: Post-Punk Monk 
Date:   06-12-17 12:54

T have thought about this effect for years. I am 53. I can sing along with all three of those 1945 tunes; I heard them many times growing up, but not the Journey song. I took pains to severely limit all exposure to Journey. Sometimes, I don't hear this crap rock until it gets played on the gym's sound system, where I am vulnerable. Case in point: I just heard today Guns + Roses "Welcome To The Jungle," which I had studiously avoided for decades! Opinion: It was even worse than the intro or outro which I would sometimes hear/see on MTV, back in the day [before/after switching the channel]. I never heard more than 30 seconds of it, ever.

Former TP subscriber [81, 82, 83, 84]

https://postpunkmonk.com
For further rumination on the Fresh New Sound of Yesterday®

Post Edited (06-12-17 16:04)

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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: MrFab 
Date:   06-12-17 16:22

I think the issue has to do with sound quality. No, radio didn't play much Big Band era stuff by the time we were kids because FM was getting popular, and even AM played only hi-fi sounds. & 78 rpm vintage recordings just didn't pass muster. Hence, the EZ station my mom listened to played plenty of '50s+ Sinatra, but don't recall any '40s crooner era Frankie, even tho he was hugely popular then. Journey sounds "as good" (not artistically good, obviously, just sonically) as anything today, maybe better: analog recording, no autotune, not overly compressed.

Also, the relentless forward march of culture ended sometime in the 90s, when everything stopped, and pop started eating itself. Remember back in the days, career and genre peaks lasted just a few years. 1955: everyone play rockabilly! 1962: everybody surf! 1965: folk-rock! 1968: psychedelia! etc. But now that everything is retro, Journey (or anything else) doesn't necessarily sound dated. Hey, the hip kids nowadays try hard to get a "dated" sound.



Post Edited (06-12-17 16:23)

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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: breno 
Date:   06-13-17 17:35

Here's a double-anachronism - in 1973/74 The Sting sent "The Entertainer" by Scott Joplin to the top of the US charts - the song was over 70 years old by that time. Granted, it was a newly recorded version, but the song was originally published in 1902.

Further, The Sting was set in 1938. No one was listening to much ragtime music in 1938. Ragtime was a turn-of-the-century groove, and the use of it in the movie was really out of place.

So a movie set 35 years after "The Entertainer"s actual era managed to make it a massive hit 35 years after the supposed time period of the movie.

None of which is really here or there, but I heard "The Entertainer" on this past weekend's rerun of America's Top 40 and was struck by how weird it was that the song was a massive hit in 1974, rubbing shoulders with "Band on the Run" and "TSOP".

Another weird bit of 70s chart action was the song "Shaving Cream" by Bennie Bell, which became a top 40 hit in 1975 (thanks in large part to Dr. Demento), despite having been recorded in 1946.



Post Edited (06-13-17 17:36)

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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: Post-Punk Monk 
Date:   06-14-17 08:34

Benny Bell's "Shaving Cream" became a top 40 hit in 1975?? Color me flabbergasted.

Former TP subscriber [81, 82, 83, 84]

https://postpunkmonk.com
For further rumination on the Fresh New Sound of Yesterday®

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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: breno 
Date:   06-14-17 09:32

Yep. It hit #30 nationally, but I think maybe went even higher in the St. Louis market, as all my sixth grade classmates couldn't stop singing it.

Thanks to having cool older brothers, I was already an insufferable hipster by sixth grade and was annoyed that my fellow 11-year-olds could enjoy such lowbrow entertainment when they could be listening to Kimono My House or Secret Treaties instead.

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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: Delvin 
Date:   06-14-17 10:17

> Thanks to having cool older brothers, I was already an insufferable hipster by sixth grade
> and was annoyed that my fellow 11-year-olds could enjoy such lowbrow entertainment when they
> could be listening to Kimono My House or Secret Treaties instead.

Holy jeez, and to think M. Johnson was impressed that I was already a Bowie fan in 1976.



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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: zwirnm 
Date:   06-14-17 19:48

My favorite factoid of that sort is that Irving Berlin was 95 when "Puttin' on the Ritz" made it to Top Ten in the recording by Taco. The song was already over 50 years old (written 1930) and associated closely with Fred Astaire.

Wonderful article from 1983: http://www.nytimes.com/1983/09/19/arts/irving-berlin-is-back-on-the-pop-charts.html

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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: Delvin 
Date:   06-15-17 10:03

Yep, Taco's version made Mr Berlin the oldest living songwriter ever to have a Number One single. Of course, going with what Fab said, none of the versions of "Puttin' on the Ritz" from the '30s or '40s would've drawn that sort of airplay in 1983.



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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: Post-Punk Monk 
Date:   06-15-17 10:09

Ugh! That Taco was indigestible! The worst sort of novelty music imaginable.

Former TP subscriber [81, 82, 83, 84]

https://postpunkmonk.com
For further rumination on the Fresh New Sound of Yesterday®

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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: Delvin 
Date:   06-15-17 16:07

I didn't think "Puttin' on the Ritz" was so bad. I've certainly heard more annoying novelties.

Of course, Taco's subsequent career showed him to be a one-trick pony, but that should've surprised nobody.



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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: Michael Toland 
Date:   06-16-17 11:13

My fiancee sings along lustily every time this comes on oldies radio. It's not as good as Gene Wilder and Peter Boyle's take in Young Frankenstein, but what would be?

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 Re: Sentimental Journey
Author: STEVE 
Date:   06-16-17 18:56

that's a wonderfully thought provoking question hbk. I reckon the 40's were jittery times. Spies, Nazi's, Atom bomb's and Girls with bad hairdo's that made them look seventy. Coincidentally, the music that they were dancing to was being played by people that looked even older.
Still, i wouldn't trust any of them hep cats with my daughter.



Post Edited (06-16-17 19:14)

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