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 Bruce
Author: nosepail 
Date:   03-27-12 19:20

I saw Bruce for the first time at the Garden in Boston last night. Other than the fact that the presentation suffered from WTMPOS (way too many people on the stage syndrome), I found the show highly enjoyable. He had fabulous energy. He did almost 3 hours. He body surfed. He did a ton of stuff off the new Wrecking Ball album, most of which held up pretty well. (Wrecking Ball may not be great but I like it more than anything the Stones put out after they turned 40 years old). He did some Born To Run era classics, 3 songs from The Rising, which sounded fabulous, and some random cheesy soul covers. He did nothing from the period 1980-2000 period strangely. Peter Wolf showed up for a duet, as he always freakin does here in Boston (man, that dude is like a bad penny around these parts). Overall, the show was loose, baggy, varied, and fun. The man doesnt have much of a voice anymore. He even struggled getting through some songs with very minimal range from The River and Darkness At The Edge Of The Town. I wish I could have seen him in his prime, but the 60 year old man still puts on a damn good show.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: Jermoe 
Date:   03-28-12 09:01

I attended the first "official" show of this tour in Atlanta, on March 18th. Last night, I was just telling my dear old ma that I felt like it was a good concert, but the problem with seeing Springsteen about 15 times over the years is that the bar's been set pretty high.

The 17-pc. band did feel like a bit much, but I think they've reached a stage where taking the usual 9- or 10-person crew (with replacements for Danny Federici and Clarence Clemons) on tour wasn't as exciting as it could've been.

The sole '80s/'90s tune at the show I attended was "Dancing in the Dark," which wouldn't have been my pick, but it's aged pretty well, for a song played probably millions of times...

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 Re: Bruce
Author: HollowbodyKay 
Date:   03-28-12 10:25

Quote:


The sole '80s/'90s tune at the show I attended was "Dancing in the Dark," which wouldn't have been my pick, but it's aged pretty well, for a song played probably millions of times...


"Millions?"

Actually, I'd estimate much higher.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: rebelwithoutaclue 
Date:   03-28-12 12:25

dancing in the dark for a mainstream song that got overplayed really does have great lyrics. just the start of the song of springsteen claiming he gets up in the evening instead of the morning makes him a songwriter who can make a hit and not sound like a cliche.
how many times do you guys think you heard that song or any other average classic rock staple? im starting to like again much of the overplayed songs based on avoiding them for years

overplayed songs thaT I like- layla,dancing in the dark
overplayed songs that i cant stand - money-pink floyd and much of the doors catalog

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 Re: Bruce
Author: nosepail 
Date:   03-28-12 12:32

Dancing in the Dark never gets old for me. I love the line about "sitting around here trying to write this book." It is so specific, and yet you know exactly the anxious emotion that is imparted by that. Born to Run also, is a perfect perfect perfect song I never tire of. There is nothing I can say about it that hasnt been said, but the orchestration is so perfect, and the final verse/chorus never cease to give me goosebumps. Every damn time.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: erikalbany 
Date:   03-28-12 12:36

"I love the line about 'sitting around here trying to write this book.' It is so specific, and yet you know exactly the anxious emotion that is imparted by that."

Alright, Nosepail and Bruce, stop messing around with my psyche and plucking the strings of my anxiety.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: nosepail 
Date:   03-28-12 12:40

For me, it's writing code. It's all the same anxiety. Except mine has to compile.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: Michael Toland 
Date:   03-28-12 12:41

This should probably be a new thread, but since you asked:

Overplayed songs I still dig: "Don't Fear the Reaper," "The Boys Are Back in Town," "Tighten Up" (the Black Keys tune, not Archie Bell & the Drells'), "Stay With Me," "Maggie May" (maybe because I didn't learn to appreciate it until just a few years ago), pretty much anything by the Who (except "Squeezebox"), the Beatles and CCR

Overplayed songs I can no longer stand: "Squeezebox," "Free Bird" (I still love the original Skynyrd, but I don't ever want to hear that song again), "Layla" (no matter what the version), "Supermassive Black Hole," pretty much anything by Zeppelin or Eric Clapton

I think the only reason I can still stand "The Boys Are Back in Town" is because (a) I don't watch sports or go to events and (b) I love Lynott's lyrics - I always feel like I'm right there beside him, experiencing it all with him. It's a simple song but has such a sense of place.

I go back and forth on the Stones. I tend to listen more to the non-massive hits when I'm spinning records, but I don't mind it when "Jumpin' Jack Flash" comes on for the 50 millionth time, because it usually sounds better than anything surrounding it. I could live without hearing "Start Me Up" ever again, though.

Our local alt.rock station (who plays THE LIVING SHIT out of Muse and the Black Keys, which is why they're cited above) also plays a shit-ton of Nirvana, still. I'm not sick of them yet, but I can feel it coming. I haven't listened to a Nirvana record in at least a decade, so that's probably why I'm not burnt on them yet. But it won't be much longer until "Smells Like Teen Spirit" and "All Apologies" (the "unplugged" version, which I'm alone in thinking is inferior to the studio version) join the "can no longer stand" list.

There was a time when our local triple-A station beat Springsteen's "Tunnel of Love" into the ground, which was a drag for me, since that record is one of the few Boss LPs I like. But it's been a long time since any ToL stuff got any airplay in Austin. It's been back to "Born to Run," Born in the USA and the recent records in the past decade or so.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: nosepail 
Date:   03-28-12 12:46

I still love Stairway To Heaven, and am quite happy whenever it comes on the radio. Stones: I dont want to hear Satisfaction, Brown Sugar, Angie, and Start Me Up anymore, but the rest I still enjoy. Squeeze box ? Aaaaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrghhhhhhhhhh! Why must this lame joke of a song continue to be perpetuated on our ear drums? Who are You, on the other hand, still kicks ass.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: Michael Toland 
Date:   03-28-12 13:15

I've ranted before about how classic rock radio reduces artists with large, rich catalogs to a half-dozen or less tracks. Our local classic rock station has the Who down to "Pinball Wizard," "Baba O'Riley," "Won't Get Fooled Again," "Who Are You" (all of which I still love) and, yes, "Squeezebox." Why that one instead of "Behind Blue Eyes" or "I Can See For Miles" I do not know. I'm sure Townsend cringes thinking about it still getting airplay...until he gets his royalty check.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: Jermoe 
Date:   03-28-12 14:45

When they played "Dancing in the Dark" a couple of weeks ago, my concert partner and I had a brief discussion about how we'd both thought the lyrics completely bogus in 1985. We've looked at clouds from both sides now. If you know what I mean.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: Delvin 
Date:   03-29-12 12:04

I've seen Springsteen only once. It was 1980, shortly after I moved to Mobile, Alabama (where I spent my freshman year of college). I had heard of the guy, but his music hadn't really infiltrated my radar. A lot of my newfound friends at college, though, were big fans, and had pooled their resources for his upcoming concert. (These were the same friends who introduced me to The Rocky Horror Picture Show.) One of those people volunteered to wait in line overnight to get the tickets. I can still remember the look in her eyes when she told me how nervous she'd been, sleeping overnight on the sidewalk with $242 cash in her pocket. She bought 22 tickets.

Well, one of those 22 people got sick (which fits the law of averages, I suppose), so I got to take that person's ticket. The show was incredible. Springsteen and the E Street Band absolutely left no ass unkicked. They played two 90-minute sets with intermission, plus an hour-long encore.

Despite that glorious concert, though, I didn't become a very big fan of Springsteen's music. My friends bent my ear with The River all year long, but only about half the songs on that album did anything for me. Most of the ballads bored me, and I got thoroughly sick of "Hungry Heart." About midway through the school year, I landed with a new roommate who turned me on to Bruce's Seventies work, which I vastly preferred.

After I moved back to Colorado, I tried to get tickets to Bruce's next Denver gig, but they sold out too fast. By the next time he came through, dude was in full-on enormo-gantic mode. The songs from Born in the U.S.A., even "Dancing in the Dark," got old for me even faster than "Hungry Heart" had. (MTV didn't help. The only thing I gave a shit about in any of his videos was Courteney Cox.) Besides, by that time, all my big-rock-star appreciation was reserved for Prince.

Still, that 1980 show in Mobile remains in my personal top ten, and Bruce's Seventies albums always will have a place in my collection. The man doesn't have any dates coming up in my neck of the woods, but if, as Nose and Jermoe said, he's mostly dropping his '80s and '90s stuff from his set lists, then I may have to get a ticket when the opportunity arises.



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 Re: Bruce
Author: Delvin 
Date:   03-29-12 15:04

And while we're on the topic ...

Overplayed classic rock songs I still dig:

Anything by the Beatles, Zeppelin, CCR, Byrds, Van Halen, AC/DC, Rush, Pink Floyd
Anything by the Stones, up through Tattoo You (anything after that is "product," not "classic")
Anything by The Who, up through Quadrophenia
Anything by Thin Lizzy (since only two or three of their songs ever get played anyway)
Anything by Queen
Almost anything by Springsteen, up through Darkness on the Edge of Town
Almost anything from Aerosmith, up through Draw the Line
"Don't Fear the Reaper" (also "Burnin' for You" and "E.T.I.")
"Maggie May," "You Wear It Well," "Stay with Me," "(I Know) I'm Losing You"
"Layla" (the Derek & the Dominos original)
"Paranoid"
"Frankenstein," "Free Ride"

Overplayed songs I'm so done with:

Any frickin' tune by the Doors
Anything by the Grateful Dead
Almost anything else by Clapton (especially "Lay Down Sally," "Cocaine" and "Wonderful Tonight")
Anything else by Aerosmith
Pretty much anything by Deep Purple
Pretty much any John Mellencamp
"Somebody to Love," "White Rabbit" (so many other good songs in the Airplane's catalog)
"Iron Man," "War Pigs"
"Free Bird" (I thnk I was done with that the first time I heard it)
"Squeeze Box," "You Better You Bet," "Who Are You" (sorry, that one sounded old from the get-go)
And, it goes without saying, even a HINT of Journey, Styx, REO, Super-frickin'-tramp and all the rest of those worthless fake-rock bands

That'll do it for now.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: nosepail 
Date:   03-29-12 15:09

Delvin, that lilst is spot on (with the exception of Who Are You). God bless ya. You should be programming our classic rock stations! (oh, you kind of do)

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 Re: Bruce
Author: nosepail 
Date:   03-29-12 16:17

Just think what a better place the world would be if every time they went to play Squeeze Box, they played 100,000 Fireflies by Superchunk instead. Net universal happiness would increase noticeably.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: hoip chiggs 
Date:   03-29-12 17:21

From Philadelphia Weekly comes this article by John Sharkey

Bruce Springsteen. The Boss. Blue Collar Rock King. He’s just a Jersey boy done good after years of working on the docks to make ends meet, just a common man breaking his ass to get by, who struck it lucky singing about his girl, his hometown and his Glory Days.

My floppy, white ass.

I’ve been fuming over the popularity of this faux working-class bozo for the better part of the last decade, and now, in what has to be the peak of the mountain of his current resurgence, I bring my unpopular opinion to you.

As someone who has worked in shitty warehouses, print shops and glass factories for the bulk of my life, I can tell you, it’s no fun. In fact, it sucks. Badly. And to paint over the grim reality of that life with a romantic brush is insulting.

The only people, I’ve found, who romanticize the up-at-dawn, back-breaking blue-collar lifestyle are people who’ve never lived it. Like the bearded, skinny jackasses I run into at parties I wasn’t invited to who lovvvvve Bruce because he’s “the realest” artist they or any one of their other freelance web designer friends have ever heard.

This Everyman image Springsteen has cultivated over the years—my god, how did he pull it off? His first record came out when he was 23. Twenty-three. Unless he was working in a coal mine at age 7, he knows very little about the kind of broke-down toil of which he croons so sincerely.

Still, I get it: You can’t blame Springsteen for selling goods to a public eager to buy them. There is a market, and someone has to provide for it.

Did I say “market”? I did. Make no mistake, Springsteen’s image, from top down—what he wears, what he sings about—is a marketing choice. Every breath is calculated, every move researched and deployed with precision. He’s no different than Lady Gaga marketing herself to the fashion industry or Coldplay to feminine hygiene products. The purity you’ve placed upon him is a myth.

He’s been perceived as such an angel for so long, it seems odd even to question it. So people don’t. There’s a whole new generation coming up who blindly bathe in the light of the Cult of Bruce without even questioning whether, for instance, in Ticketmaster’s controversial attempt to cut down on Springsteen scalpers by only selling nontransferable electronic tickets, the man himself actually tried to help his fans escape this lose-lose scenario.

It’s this new generation of Springsteen fans who are the most annoying. They look at the musical landscape and see vapidity. They see Nicki Minaj and Rihanna. They see Chris Brown, Ke$ha and Katy Perry. They want to disassociate with the airheads who call this kind of music their own. So they adopt Springsteen as a signifier of their own validity, their own worth. To listen to Springsteen at an early age is to distance yourself from your bubblegum-listening peers. They see substance in Springsteen, so they strap him on as if he were a shield against vacuousness.

And so Bruce is now more popular than ever, because he’s playing to two markets. He’s got the lifers who have grown up with him, who continue to hear him played on a never-ending loop on WMMR and WXPN—plus a new generation of whiners who think listening to him makes them less whiney by association.

Right now, Springsteen is everywhere; he cannot be escaped. He’s got a new (atrocious) album out, Wrecking Ball . He was the keynote speaker at South By Southwest. He’s got a goddamn exhibit at the National Constitution Center. And, this month, there are two Bruce tribute bands playing here—one at Johnny Brenda’s, one at the christening of Xfinity Live!—on top of the man’s own two shows at the Wells Fargo Center on the 28th and 29th. No small feat for a guy who hasn’t done anything artistically challenging since putting out his best work some 30 years ago.

Look, we all need heroes and people to idolize. I’m no different. I need figures to cling to in these tough times too—to find some solace in grand, larger-than-life escapism. I can’t deny the power of “Born To Run.” I just wish more people were willing to admit “Working on a Dream” is faux-populist horse shit. And don’t even get me started on “We Take Care of Our Own.”

Springsteen isn’t terrible enough to demonize, but he isn’t great enough to canonize, either. He’s the Tim Tebow of music: not very good, but different enough from the rest to stand out. He’s a piece of toilet paper clinging to the bottom of American culture’s shoe. And because he’s remained stuck there so long, we’ve attached undeserved meaning to him.

He’s a rock musician, not The Boss.

And anyway, bosses are assholes.

Read more: http://www.philadelphiaweekly.com/music/features/144417475.html#ixzz1qXjbEFuM

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 Re: Bruce
Author: MrFab 
Date:   03-29-12 18:06

Thanks for that, hoip! Sums it up nicely. And I've always said that anyone who thinks Broose is the voice of the workin' man should be forced to listen to the Minutemen's "This Ain't No Picnic" until they are deprogrammed.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: Jermoe 
Date:   03-29-12 20:07

This guy...seriously?

He makes a number of assumptions I'd take issue with, but I'll just go with this: Springsteen has substantially more songs that deal with either romantic entanglements/disappointments, the whole father/son thing, political stuff, as well as crime and punishment than he does so-called "workingman" tunes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nghqjBwZTiE

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 Re: Bruce
Author: Jermoe 
Date:   03-29-12 20:21

I would also like to note that I've long since given up trying to convince anyone about the merits of the actual music itself, and I certainly wouldn't attempt to make that case with you gents.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: Delvin 
Date:   03-29-12 23:30

Ha ha ha haahhh, sweet! I don't agree with John Snarkey's editorial 100 percent, but I usually enjoy a rant like that (having written a couple myself). Personally, I haven't noticed any next-generation Springsteen fans milling about; from what I've seen, those younger ones trying to distance themselves from the current shitty pop sound tend to go for the harder classic sounds, such as Zep, Hendrix, VH, AC/DC, etc. Anyway! After a stressful day at work, that piece was just what I needed.

Which brings me to my next topic: add The Cars to my "classic rock I dig" list, along with Hendrix, The Police, Cheap Trick and Tom Petty.

Thanks for the kind words, Nose. Once I get settled up here, I promise I'll seek out a new radio gig.



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 Re: Bruce
Author: Jermoe 
Date:   03-30-12 09:40

Delvin, I'm also unaware of these young web designers who grok the E Street sound.

Musically, the baton's been picked up by The Arcade Fire and The Gaslight Anthem, however.

I know tonight she comes.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: mats84 
Date:   03-31-12 09:07


I always have had mixed feelings on Springsteen - I think I actually prefer his first 2 albums to the later bigger ones just because they are weirder and less easy to pin down. I like when he detours from his norm - Nebraska and Tunnel of Love are really good records. He doesn't have a lot of records I'd say "suck" - if any (?)

But I think what turns me off about him is what everyone else likes - his earnestness, his "meaning it". There's a bit of Springsteen in guys I love - Westerberg, Ike Reilly, etc. but something about Springsteen himself that distances me where others are pulled in by him.

There's something about him I find corny which kind of makes me feel bad for feeling that way. I think it all goes back to the song The River - that's what I think about when I think of him - that "but lately there ain't been much work, on account of the economy" line - where I appreciate the sentiment, I don't doubt it's sincerity, but it's presented so literally, so matter of factly, that it doesn't hit my musical G-spot at all.




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 Re: Bruce
Author: totaji 
Date:   03-31-12 10:12

I love the Bruce rant, but barely agree with very little of it.

Does Bruce really glorify the actual labor working men do?

Is Bruce a closet Republican? Does he wear Polo brand golf clothing while hitting the links with Rush Limbo?
Is he a metrosexual who wears prada skinny suits?
Is he really gay? (not that it is wrong...but just not his image.)

My point is, unless he does any of this type of stuff he is being as genuine as anybody.
If you expect him to live in a tiny 2 bedroom house in Jersey with his fat/ugly wife and work down at the "dock" or be a garbage man... that says more about your ridiculous world view than his genuineness.

and... wow Delvin, you have a high tolerance for Aerosmith and ACDC... I can dig maybe some of Aerosmiths first few albums in extremely rare circumstances. Same with ACDC. Only a few with Brian J.

And no Police what so ever!

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 Re: Bruce
Author: Delvin 
Date:   04-01-12 18:53

I have a high "tolerance" for a lot of things. I love, absolutely love The Police. (Well, perhaps not absolutely, as evidenced by the fact that I couldn't be bothered to buy tickets to their reunion tour.) But I'd put all of Sting's post-Synchronicity work on the "so done with it" list.

Oh, add Jethro Tull and Yes to my "done" list too. I'm not a huge fan of ELP, but I don't recall hearing much of their music getting overplayed, so I wouldn't shovel them onto that list yet.



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 Re: Bruce
Author: Delvin 
Date:   04-05-12 10:54

> Delvin, that lilst is spot on (with the exception of Who Are You). God bless ya. You should be
> programming our classic rock stations! (oh, you kind of do)

Well, I will this coming Easter Sunday, for a little while. I'll be back in Colorado Springs for the weekend, and (among other things) I'm filling in for the late-night DJ at KRCC.

The show will be from midnight to 2 AM, Mountain Time, so I don't expect anyone on the board to be listening at that hour. But this is one of the shows that's archived for two weeks. (I guess the regular DJ worked out a deal or something.) So if anyone wants to hear it, they can.

Meanwhile, anyone got any recommendations? I've been working too hard lately — haven't kept up so well on the music, I'm ashamed to say.



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 Re: Bruce
Author: rebelwithoutaclue 
Date:   04-05-12 11:13

goiung with easter theme- tom thumb blues- bob dylan. {first line- and its easter time too}

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 Re: Bruce
Author: Delvin 
Date:   04-05-12 12:54

I'm thinking of making it another show exclusively of live recordings. Here's the playlist from the last all-live show I did. Thoughts? Recommendations? Favorites that I didn't get around to?



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 Re: Bruce
Author: Jermoe 
Date:   04-05-12 14:43

Don't know if there's a legit version of this live one floating around, but since Sunday is Julian Lennon's 49th birthday:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fa7lQcliNLY

I know it was on the soundtrack to a mid-'80s teen movie called Playing for Keeps. I never saw the film, but I purchased the soundtrack for 50 cents at a mall record store circa 1988.

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 Re: Bruce
Author: Jermoe 
Date:   04-05-12 22:20

Got another idea, Delvin:

http://archive.org/details/bbragg1991-04-28.flac16

4 nice ones there. Take your pick.

Let me hear this chorus drip with irony.



Post Edited (04-05-12 22:26)

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